Architecture & Design

Elena Manferdini

Posted January 16, 2015

Marina del Rey, CA


Elena Manferdini is an architect, engineer, industrial designer, fashion designer, and teacher. Manferdini applies construction techniques from the engineering field to design clothing, products, and buildings, and patterning has been a particular focus of her research. In 2004, she founded the design firm Atelier Manferdini, which has collaborated with companies such as Moroso, Nike, and Alessi on product designs. She teaches at the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc), Los Angeles.

 Arlecchino, 2011; photo credit Marcel Erminy

Arlecchino, 2011; photo credit Marcel Erminy

J. Morgan Puett

Posted January 16, 2015

Beach Lake, PA


The work of conceptual artist J. Morgan Puett encompasses fashion, architecture, public projects, and frequent collaborations with other artists. Puett’s work is imbued with the atmosphere of the rural South, where she grew up. During the 1990s, she ran a series of clothing stores in New York that were art environments as well as venues for her Amish-inspired fashions. In 1997, she moved to rural Pennsylvania to create an artist’s colony named Mildred’s Lane, which operates as a residency for artists and students, a space for landscape and architecture projects, public events, communal dinners, and a studio for research into textile and clothing history. 

 Wholesale: To The Trade Only (J. Morgan Puett, Inc. Archive 1984-2001), entire archive drenched in beeswax, 2006; photo credit the artist

Wholesale: To The Trade Only (J. Morgan Puett, Inc. Archive 1984-2001), entire archive drenched in beeswax, 2006; photo credit the artist

Jenny E. Sabin

Posted January 16, 2015

Philadelphia, PA


Jenny E. Sabin is an architectural designer, artist, and educator whose work focuses on the intersection between architecture and science. Sabin is the principal of Jenny Sabin Studio (since 2005), an experimental design studio, and is co-founder of the hybrid research and design unit, LabStudio, where architects, scientists, and engineers collaborate to  develop, analyze, and abstract dynamic biological systems to develop new ideas about the ecological design of architecture. She is also an Assistant Professor in the area of Design and Emerging Technologies in the Department of Architecture at Cornell University.

 Branching Morphogenesis, 2008; photo credit the artist

Branching Morphogenesis, 2008; photo credit the artist

Ada Tolla & Giuseppe Lignano

Posted January 16, 2015

New York / USA Booth Fellows


Ada Tolla and Giuseppe Lignano both studied at the Universitá di Napoli, where they met, before moving to New York to complete post-graduate studies at Columbia University. In 1993, they founded their architectural firm LOT-EK, which is known for the adaptive reuse and up-cycling of infrastructural and industrial structures, most notably the standard 40-foot shipping container, but also airplane fuselages, oil truck tanks, and cement-mixer drums. Tolla and Lignano both teach at Columbia University.

 Puma City, 2008, by LOT-EK; photo credit Danny Bright

Puma City, 2008, by LOT-EK; photo credit Danny Bright

Ada Tolla & Giuseppe Lignano

Posted January 16, 2015

New York / USA Booth Fellows


Ada Tolla and Giuseppe Lignano both studied at the Universitá di Napoli, where they met, before moving to New York to complete post-graduate studies at Columbia University. In 1993, they founded their architectural firm LOT-EK, which is known for the adaptive reuse and up-cycling of infrastructural and industrial structures, most notably the standard 40-foot shipping container, but also airplane fuselages, oil truck tanks, and cement-mixer drums. Tolla and Lignano both teach at Columbia University.

 Puma City, 2008, by LOT-EK; photo credit Danny Bright

Puma City, 2008, by LOT-EK; photo credit Danny Bright

Mabel O. Wilson

Posted January 16, 2015

New York, NY


Mabel O. Wilson is an architect and scholar whose interdisciplinary practice includes designing buildings, creating speculative installations, and writing. Wilson also runs the design firm 6Ten Studio in New York. Her research examines the history of African American and black diasporic culture within the built environment and expands the Euro-American legacy of architectural discourse. Wilson’s book, Progress and Prospects: Black Americans in the World of Fairs and Museums, will be published in 2012. She is Associate Professor at Columbia University.

 Shroud of Memory, 2005; photo credit the artist

Shroud of Memory, 2005; photo credit the artist

Teddy Cruz

Posted January 16, 2015

San Diego, CA


Architect Teddy Cruz’s work dwells at the bi-cultural border between San Diego, CA, and Tijuana, Mexico, and is influenced by the informal structures that emerge from a community’s need for housing. Cruz began studying architecture in Guatemala. After immigrating to the United States, he studied at California State Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo, and Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. Cruz established estudio teddy cruz in 2000 in La Jolla. He is a professor of public culture and urbanism in the Visual Arts Department at the University of California, San Diego.

 Manufactured Sites: Housing urbanism made of waste, 2008; photo credit estudio teddy cruz

Manufactured Sites: Housing urbanism made of waste, 2008; photo credit estudio teddy cruz

Greg Lynn

Posted January 16, 2015

Venice, CA


Architect Greg Lynn founded his firm, Greg Lynn FORM, in Venice, CA, in 1994. He attended Miami University of Ohio and Princeton University. Lynn is known for his early use of computer-aided design to produce biomorphic architectural forms (“blob architecture”), and he has written extensively on these ideas. In 2000, he was profiled by Time Magazine in their projection of twenty-first-century innovators in the field of architecture and design. Lynn is on the faculty of the University of Applied Arts in Vienna, Austria, Yale University, and UCLA.

  Fountain, 2010, Hammer Museum; photo credit Richard Schulman

Fountain, 2010, Hammer Museum; photo credit Richard Schulman

David Reinfurt

Posted January 16, 2015

New York, NY


David Reinfurt is a graphic designer whose innovative work encompasses design, publishing, and performance. Reinfurt attended the University of North Carolina and Yale University. As an interaction designer with IDEO San Francisco, he designed the interface for the MTA MetroCard vending machines, and, from 1999–2006, he ran ORG, a graphic design practice. In 2006, with graphic designer Stuart Bailey, Reinfurt established Dexter Sinister, a basement workshop and bookstore in New York. The studio works on-demand, publishing with inexpensive local machinery and using alternate distribution strategies. Reinfurt is also co-editor of the arts journal Dot Dot Dot.

  Watchscan, 2009, Dexter Sinister, unaltered high-resolution direct digital scan, while the scanning head moves slowly down the flat-bed, the watch (and time itself) continues to move always forward; photo credit the artist

Watchscan, 2009, Dexter Sinister, unaltered high-resolution direct digital scan, while the scanning head moves slowly down the flat-bed, the watch (and time itself) continues to move always forward; photo credit the artist

Neil Denari

Posted January 16, 2015

Los Angeles, CA


Denari established his architecture practice in 1988 and in the following three decades has become a leading voice in the pedagogy and practice of contemporary architecture. His work has evolved from unbuilt theoretical projects to a growing number of realized commissions that illustrate that progressive ideology is buildable. From his earlier machined aesthetic to his more recent employment of smooth sinuous modeled forms, Denari’s architecture has evolved into a matured ideology that has influenced numerous generations of younger architects. A teacher since 1986, Denari is the former director of SCI-Arc (1997–2001), and is currently a professor at UCLA’s School of Architecture.

 HL23, 2009; photo © Hayes Davidson

HL23, 2009; photo © Hayes Davidson