Einar de la Torre & Jamex de la Torre

Posted January 16, 2015

San Diego, CA


Einar and Jamex de la Torre are brothers originally from Guadalajara, Mexico, they have been collaborating in earnest since the mid-nineties. They work together to develop their signature style mix media work with blown glass sculpture. Their pieces represent a multifaceted view of life that reflects a complex and humorous aesthetic that could be called baroque. Their approach is additive, constantly layering material and meaning. Their influences range from Catholic iconography to German expressionism and pay homage to Mexican vernacular art as well as pre-Columbian objects and images. Many of their pieces address issues of the border region as they live and work on both sides, as well as aspects of human sacrifice. In recent years, they have been experimenting with lenticular printing, creating photomural installations alongside blown glass. They have won the San Diego Foundation Grant Award, The San Diego Art Prize, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Award and the Joan Mitchell Foundation Award. They have had 15 solo museum exhibitions including the National Glass Centre Museum in England, the Glazhuiz in Belgium, the Mesa Arts Center Museum, and the Chrysler Museum of Art.

Natalie Diaz

Posted January 16, 2015

Mohave Valley, AZ


Natalie Diaz is an up and coming poet whose first book When My Brother Was an Aztec has been critically acclaimed. Writing about her history and community, Diaz has committed herself to studying and preserving the Mojave language at Fort Mojave. For the last four years, she has been working alongside her Elders to compile a digital dictionary and encyclopedia of the Mojave language as the Director of the Mojave Language Recovery Program. A former professional basketball player, Diaz compares the rhythm of her poetry to the rhythm of the game. Diaz is the recipient of the Narrative Prize for Poetry, the Native Arts & Cultures Foundation Fellowship, a Lannan Literary Fellowship, and the 2014 Holmes National Poetry Prize.

LaToya Ruby Frazier

Posted January 16, 2015

Chicago, IL


In her highly anticipated first book The Notion of Family (Aperture Foundation 2014) photographer and media artist LaToya Ruby Frazier has compellingly set her story of three generations—her Grandma Ruby, her mother, and herself—against larger questions of civic belonging and responsibility. The work documents her own struggles and interactions with family and the expectations of community, and includes the documentation of the demise of Braddock’s only hospital, reinforcing the idea that the history of a place is frequently written on the body as well as the landscape.

Through photography, performance, and video Frazier uses the conventions of social documentary to probe and upend traditional narratives of urban growth and the triumph of industry. Exposing the underbelly of corporate practices—rapid deindustrialization and outsourcing, environmental negligence, and inner-city gentrification—Frazier’s work examines the crises of postindustrial communities and class divisions wrought by capital.

Her work is informed by late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century modes of representation in documentary practice. Through a collaborative effort with her family and community residents Frazier’s works emphasize the importance of cultural memory and sheds light on invisible realities.

A recipient of a 2014 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship Frazier is best known for her 2013 solo exhibition A Haunted Capital at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. She is a recently appointed assistant professor of photography at School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has previously held academic and curatorial positions at Yale University School of Art, Rutgers University, and Syracuse University.

Sydney Freeland

Posted January 16, 2015

Los Angeles, CA


Sydney Freeland is a Native American and Transgender filmmaker. Her debut feature film, Drunktown’s Finest, explored the Navajo reservation where she grew up and the impact of gender, race, and culture within the community. The film premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival and went on to win both the Grand Jury Prize and HBO Outstanding First Feature awards at LA Outfest 2014. Freeland was also a participant in the Sundance Screenwriter’s and Director’s Labs, and is the recipient of a Fulbright Scholarship.

Sigrid Gilmer

Posted January 16, 2015

Los Angeles, CA


Sigrid Gilmer is a Los Angeles based playwright who makes black comedies that are historically bent, totally perverse, joyfully irreverent and are concerned with issues of identity, pop culture and contemporary American society. Her work has been performed at the Skylight Theatre, Pavement Group, Know Theatre of Cincinnati, Cornerstone Theater Company and Highways Performance Space. She is a winner of the Map Fund Creative Exploration Grant and the James Irving Foundation Fellowship.

Rigoberto González

Posted January 16, 2015

Forest Hills, NY


Rigoberto González is a multi-genre writer of poetry, prose, essays, memoirs, poetry criticism and book reviews. He is the author of fifteen books including Butterfly Boy, The Mariposa Club, Men Without Bliss, Unpeopled Eden, Autobiography of My Hungers and Black Blossoms. His work has appeared in approximately 50 anthologies and 200 literary journals. He is currently a Professor of English at Rutgers University in Newark, New Jersey. González is invested in making visible the queer Latino experience through his writing and is interested in the connection between poetry and activism. González is the recipient of the Lenore Marshall Prize, a Lambda Literary Award, Barnes & Noble Writers Award, New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship, The Poetry Center Book Award, National Endowment for the Arts Grant, the American Book Award and the Guggenheim Fellowship.

 

d. Sabela grimes

Posted January 16, 2015

Los Angeles, CA


d. Sabela Grimes is a choreographer, writer, composer and educator whose interdisciplinary performance work and pedagogical approach reveal a vested interest in the physical and meta-physical efficacies of Afro-diasporic cultural practices. Sabela’s AfroFuturistic dance theater projects, like World War WhatEver, 40 Acres & A Microchip, BulletProof Deli, and ELECTROGYNOUS, consider invisibilized histories and grapple with constructed notions of masculinity and manhood while conceiving a womynist consciousness. Using a mix of socio-historical observation, self-examination and exploration, each creative chronicle manifests and exists through layers of non-linear arrangements that sonically, visually and kinesthetically blur the line between our most precious and protected binaries. Audio sampling as citation is a critical compositional tool used in Sabela’s dance and music making endeavors. His compositions employ technology to create unusual sound-shapes that twist the form and function of modern sound design and maintain the custom of “versioning” found in Afro-diasporic music traditions.

Daoud Haroon

Posted January 16, 2015

Durham, NC


Born in Boston (Roxbury) Massachusetts as John Mancebo Lewis – he studied Trombone and played with many of the Boston based Musicians, Dancers, Poets and Artists of the late 1940’s, and 1950’s as both a Trombonist and a percussionist (hand Drums/Conga) . He migrated to New York City in 1960 in the band of Ken Makanda McIntyre where they recorded and performed during the “NYC Loft Period” of the 1960’s and the 1970’s. Mr Haroon also recorded and performed in the bands of Sam Rivers, Ronnie Boykins and Earl Cross, to name a few.

In 1970 Mr. Haroon entered Wesleyan University, Middletown,Connecticut as a student /instructor in the music department. It was during his years at Wesleyan that he became interested in Ethnomusicology and began to explore many types of musics particularly the music of Africa, the Middle East and Asia. He began to explore the use of music as a healing modality (Music Therapy) and the interrelationship of indigenous music(s), particularly the evolution of African American Music from its African sources and the development of music in the African Diaspora. While at Wesleyan he was instrumental in helping to develop the Jazz Studies component at Wesleyan and served briefly in 1973/4 as Visiting Artist in African American Music. He has a BA in Music from Wesleyan and an MA in History from Texas Southern University, Houston, TX.

He is interested in the intersections of music, social justice and religion, and has travelled extensively throughout the Middle East, and Africa. While retired from teaching, he continues to perform and participate in various ensembles which include African /African American Dance – Sufi ‘spiritual’ music. He has also written several papers and short stories concerned with music, history and religion.

Mary Heilmann

Posted January 16, 2015

New York, NY


Mary Heilmann has had a distinguished career as an abstract painter, and was part of the nascent development of conceptual minimalism in New York in the early 1970’s. Her work is reflective of visual events that happened to her personally and she describes her practice as “non-verbal philosophy.” She uses painting to express thoughts, feelings and desires and engage with the outside world. Heilmann has had solo exhibitions at the Kunst Museum in Bonn, the Museum Ludwig, the Orange County Art Museum, the New Museum, the Wexner Center for the Arts and the ICA in Boston.  She is the 2012 recipient of the Biennial Award for Contemporary Art from Bonnefanten Museum, Maastricht, and has received a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, National Endowment for the Arts Grant and the Anonymous was a Woman Foundation Award. Her work is in numerous public collections including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Brooklyn Museum, the Cincinnati Art Museum, the Corcoran Gallery, the Museum of Modern Art, the Smithsonian, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum.

Leslie Hewitt

Posted January 16, 2015

New York, NY


Working with photography, sculpture, and site-specific installations, Leslie Hewitt addresses fluid notions of time. Her work oscillates between the illusionary potential of photography and the physical weight of sculpture. In her photographed arrangements, she isolates personal ephemera and the residue of mass culture to consider the fragile nature of quotidian life. Her most recent collaborations with cinematographer Bradford Young, explore photographic, topographical and psychological landscapes through a contemporary lens, exposing the tension between still photography and the cinematic experience of moving images.

Hewitt studied at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, the Yale University School of Art, and at New York University, where she was a Clark Fellow in the Africana and Visual Culture Studies programs. She was included in the 2008 Whitney Biennial and the recipient of the 2008 Art Matters research grant to the Netherlands. A selection of recent and forthcoming exhibitions include the Museum of Modern Art in New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; Artists Space in New York; Project Row Houses in Houston; and LA><ART in Los Angeles. Hewitt has held residencies at the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Museum of Fine Arts, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University and the American Academy in Berlin, Germany amongst others. She has recently joined the faculty of Barnard College in the department of Art History.